About your Search

20121101
20121130
SHOW
STATION
KRCB (PBS) 13
KQED (PBS) 12
KQEH (PBS) 9
WMPT (PBS) 5
WETA 4
LANGUAGE
English 43
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)
a lot of time in california, illinois, new york, texas. those are four states that the candidates did not spend much time if at all this year with the exception of going to fund raise. that shows how different things are now. >> woodruff: richard, it's certainly not that there hasn't been partisanship. it's a matter of... whether there's been geographic partisanship. >> that's well put, judy. ohio, for example, for most of its history for well over 100 years has stood out. it's been the mother of presidents and the maker of presidents. it's the country in microcosm. it is urban. it is rural. it is agricultural. it is industrial. it is a strong tradition of organized labor. it has significant minority populations. if you were going to disstill the united states in the mid 20th century at the end of the 20th century, you know, you'd be hard pressed to do better than ohio. in some ways it makes a lot of sense that ohio has attracted as much attention as it has. >> ifill: michael and richard, let's think about california. big, big state. very diverse. densely populated. has farms. it has
it to their advantage in states like illinois. california is a whole different story where you have an independent commission drawing the lines there. it really will dramatically she control of congress. >> i was simply going to make the point about illinois. the viewers don't think it's only the republicans who are redrawing districts. democrats did the exact same thing in illinois, and we'll see what the results are. sometimes they draw districts expecting a certain outcome and the voters srprise them. >> brown: while we're talking about the how, because earlier we talked about the senate in aw kind of bigger picture. stu, remind us about the house situation. 435 seats are up in the house but not all 435 are competitive. only about 70 or so are really worth watching for the chance of one party to steal a seat from the other party. the democrats need 25 seats in order toigate majority and presumably reinstall california, nancy pelosi as speaker beor as she once was. that seems unlikely. the democrats have said we have enough seats in play, and when we get out west, california, washington, nevada,
enough four schools in california, two in oregon and two in washington. so geography was important, academics were important and competitive levels were important. now the landscape has changed completely. geography has been thrown out completely. academics have been thrown out completely and, to some degree, competitive levels have been thrown out completely because it's all about what schools can make you the most t.v. dollars and a conference and what conferences can make schools the most t.v. dollars. that's the unifying force now. >> brown: so it's dollars and television. particularly in football, right? >> exactly. a all of those thing changes that have happened over a period of ten years now, because it began when the a.c.c. raided the big east for virginia tech, miami and boston college to improve itself as a football conference to get more t.v. dollars for football. it is about football because basketball actually5/h2y at most schools nets more dollars because the cost is less. but the potential in football because of television dollars is far greater so all of these moves
california where there are a number of issues on the ballot. having to do with taxes. and a number of other topics. >> california is really ground zero for the initiative process. they tend to have more itiatives than any other state. they have 11 this year including two competing measures that would increase taxes in different ways to fund education and help balance the state budget. >> woodruff: we also know that health care is on the ballot. remind us where and what that would mean if those were to pass. >> sure. there are five states that have votes on the affordable care act this year. in missouri, it's bill that would prohibit the state from setting up a health insurance exchange. in the other four states it's a broader asure tat attempts to block really implementation of the affordable care act. it sets up the right to have private insurance as a constitutional right in the state and prohibits the state from requiring anybody to buy insurance or penalizing anybody for failing to buy insurance. >> woodruff: and just quickly what are the polls showing on those? do we know much about th
. as you can see from some of these maps, they showed california as an island and it took a long time for that to actually get removed from the maps-- old maps, it often took 100 years, maybe 200 years. >> reporter: google and others can react more quickly because of all the input they get. thousands of times a day, people all over the world tell google, via the internet, that roads, or signage, or stores or parks have changed, or that a their own neighborhood is poorly represented and that the company needs to update its maps. google investigates the alleged errors, and tries to correct them. the concept of having people on the ground change the map is called crowd sourcing. and it's the principle pioneered by an israeli-based mapping company called waze. that firm, with a small palo alto office, uses g.p.s. to track the location of 27 million drivers who have downloaded its app. waze depends on that crowd to update its maps, determine traffic congestion and direct users to alternate routes. >> so while you're getting a free navigation service, you're also contributing to the communi
and congressional races on the ballot in california. and older americans are working longer and returning to the workforce after retiring. you can help paul solman look into that demographic shift. if you're an older worker, fill out a questionnare on the rundown. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. jeff? >> brown: and again, to our honor roll of american service personnel killed in the afghanistan conflict. we add them as their deaths are made official and photographs become available. here, in silence, are eight more. >> brown: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening with mark shields and david brooks among others. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer producti
the empire state building, seven killed at a university in oakland, california, seven dead at a sikh temple in oak creek, wisconsin. 12 killed and dozens more wound at a move yee these per in aurora, colorado. and then there was this. >> i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the -- >> congresswoman gabby giffords leading the democratic national convention in the pledge of allegiance some 20 months after she was shot in the head in arizona. >> with liberty and justice for all. (cheers and applause) >> there was one brief exchange during the second debate about gun violence. >> i also share your belief that weapons that were designed for soldiers in war theatres don't belong on our streets. >> i'm not in favor of new pieces of legislation on guns and taking guns away or making certain guns illegal. >> reporter: but during three hours of debates devoted to domestic matters the phrase "gun control" was never mentioned, not even by the democratic incumbent. >> you'll find the rest of that segment >> brown: you'll find the rest of that segment and much more on our
in economic policy. >> sreenivasan: the state of california held its first auction today of greenhouse gas pollution permits. the cap-and-trade plan is a key part of the state's global warming law enacted in 2006. under its provisions, businesses must cut emissions to a certain level or buy allowances from compani thadon't need all of their allowances. the program still has to survive a court challenge. the u.s. air force will change the way it selects officers and instructors who train new recruits. that follows a sexual abuse scandal at lackland air force base near san antonio, texas. an investigation found 23 instructors allegedly abused at least 48 female recruits. so far, five people have been convicted on charges ranging from adultery to rape. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we turn back to one of the topics raised in president obama's news conference today, the investigation of former c.i.a. director david petraeus. the former military leader's resignation after admitting to an extramarital affair raises questions about the standards am
areas. they were in illinois, california, and new england. those are all places ere the president did very well. i think that even though going into election day those were close races, but the undecideds were president obama voters. they also broke for the democratic congressional candidate. >> woodruff: in a way there was maybe coat tail as part of the president's race. >> in states where they weren't swing states the races were places where the president did well. i think democratic candidates benefited. >> woodruff: as you look at the country overall, nathan, is there a trend, is there a story to be told about who did a better job, which party or the other d a better job o targeting these races? >> i think some of it is geographic. you had democrats strengthening and dem trattic states and democratic regions such as new england where there's no longer, there's no house republicans in new england right now. >> woodruff: at all. at all. there's senator snow who is kind of holding down the fort there but... then you saw republicans strengthening their grip on the south. there were ke
with picket lines forming outside walmart stores from california to maryland. a group called our walmart organized the walk-off in 100 cities. >> we're asking for living wages, we're asking for decent scheduling. they're not things that are hard. i mean, we want health care. they're the most richest retailer in the world. >> sreenivasan: walmart executives said these protestors do not represent the 1.3 million employees who work at the company. >> sreenivasan: the stock market also got a boost from black friday, rising sharply on early reports of strong retail sales. on a shortened day of trading, the dow jones industrial average gained more than 172 points to close at 13,009. the nasdaq rose 40 points to close above 2,966. for the week, the dow gained 3.4%; the nasdaq rose nearly 4%. a european union summit in brussels broke up today without any agreement on a long-term budget. the 27-nation bloc was trying to reach consensus on a more than trillion-dollar long-term spending plan. it primarily funds farming and programs to spur growth in less- developed nations. some members backed a bu
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)